At what temperature should you serve each type of wine?

As you may have already seen, the last post was about the ideal serving temperature of wines in the summer.

We won’t stray away from the subject. This post will try to shed some light on the optimal serving temperatures of different types of Spanish wines.

 copasWine glasses prepared for tasting. Photo by Jin a Ling

We hope these guidelines help you better enjoy our wines. Take note!

Finos and Manzanillas from Jerez, such as Manzanilla La Gitana: We recommend serving these wines very cold, at 6-7ºC. Any warmer and these wines might taste a bit too sharp.

Young and fruity white wines from Southern Spain, such as Botani 2012, increase in sweetness as they get warmer. We recommend enjoying this wine cold (7-8º) in order to give prominence to the fruit.

In Spain we have great dry whites, such as Fillaboa Albariño 2013, made with indigenous grapes such as Albariño, Xarel·lo and Viura. We recommend enjoying these at 8-10º. At a lower temperature the acidity will be reinforced, while if enjoyed any warmer, the true character of the wine will be masked.

Aged white wines like the fantastic Viña Gravonia 2004 can be served from 10 to 12º. In this way, you will be able to better appreciate the wine’s structure and aromas.

Rosé wines, such as the Artazuri Rosado 2013 from the DO Navarra, can be served at a rather wide range of temperatures, from 6 to 10º. Any colder and it will lose its aromas. Any warmer and it will lose its delicate flavour.

Light and young reds, such as Gaba do Xil 2013, and the majority of Galician Mencías may be served anywhere from 12 to 14º. In this way, you will be able to appreciate the wine’s structure with the fruit taking centre stage.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, young, barrel aged and full bodied red wines, such as those made with Tempranillo grapes or reds from the Priorat may be enjoyed anywhere from 14 to 17º. This temperature range is perfect for appreciating the wine’s structure and tannins.

On the opposite extreme we find Reserva and Gran Reserva red wines, such as Rioja Alta 904 Gran Reserva 2001. These wines should be served at 17-18º. This is the only way to appreciate the wine’s bouquet and structure.

Finally, let’s focus on Cava, which should be served from 6 to 8º. Any colder and it will lose its aromas, any warmer and the notes from the fermentation will be too pronounced, at the cost of the fruity and fresh aromas.

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